Maker, writer, crafty lady
Social @ Newsweek. Ex- Forbes & Wired.
Art & tech & music & design & Internet Things
LA→SF→NYC

Beautiful and sad photo series documenting residents of Rio’s favelas displaced by the Olympics.

As Brazil prepares to host both the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympic Games, many of the poor communities in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas are being forcibly evicted from their homes as construction in preparation for both events ramps up. The favelas, or slums, have been a part of Rio de Janeiro since the late 1800s and are home to roughly 1.4 million people. Many of the residents don’t understand the legal steps involved in an eviction and have been unable to challenge the government as it removes—and often destroys—their communities.

Photographer Marc Ohrem-Leclef traveled to Rio beginning in early 2012 with a medium-format film camera to document some of the residents of the favelas for a book he titled Olympic Favela. He recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to help finance its publication by Damiani in conjunction with art-book distributor DAP Artbook.

Ohrem-Leclef said he decided to work on the project because he grew more politicized as he got older and he was familiar with Rio and felt a connection to the area. “I thought this idea was the worst thing in the world—people being displaced for an event that is meant to be universally celebrated,” Ohrem-Leclef said.

Before his first of two visits to Rio to work on the project in 2012, Ohrem-Leclef spent a significant amount of time researching the area and connecting with NGOs to help him gain access to some of the favela residents. Rather than focus on the actual evictions, Ohrem-Leclef instead decided to use portraiture as a way of highlighting what was happening to the residents. “I was going after a human face rather than a moment of eviction or demolition,” he said. “I wanted to humanize them. Of course they are human, but I wanted to place the residents on the same level as everyone else.”

My little muppet

My little muppet

Here’s a photo of me and my sister at her college graduation for #NationalSiblingDay & #TBT. Mirin is my best friend in the whole world and I’m so very proud of her. Taking this opportunity to say that family is the most important thing in the world and I’m so grateful for mine. It’s been a rough few days for us, as my cousin passed away on Monday. Wish I could be home with Mir and my parents right now. ❤️

Here’s a photo of me and my sister at her college graduation for #NationalSiblingDay & #TBT. Mirin is my best friend in the whole world and I’m so very proud of her. Taking this opportunity to say that family is the most important thing in the world and I’m so grateful for mine. It’s been a rough few days for us, as my cousin passed away on Monday. Wish I could be home with Mir and my parents right now. ❤️

New Biggie mural by Danielle Mastrion in Bed Stuy.

New Biggie mural by Danielle Mastrion in Bed Stuy.

Cute, #DitmasPark

Cute, #DitmasPark

Found in DUMBO.

Found in DUMBO.

Maya Hayuk’s colorful mural makes me happy. So does being able to go out w/o a coat! Winter is almost over!!!!!!!!

Maya Hayuk’s colorful mural makes me happy. So does being able to go out w/o a coat! Winter is almost over!!!!!!!!

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet. 

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet.

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes